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Carbon monoxide detector Buying guide

There are even more advanced carbon monoxide detectors on the market. They are easy to install and use, thanks to the plug-in design and digital display. A battery backup also ensures that this carbon monoxide alarm stays on alert even when the power is out. Which carbon monoxide detector is good? Find this helpful buying guide to make your decision.

Type

Your monitoring requirements will determine the type of CO detector you choose. If you already have smoke detectors, all you might need is a device that solely detects carbon monoxide. However, installing a combination device is an effective approach to satisfy safety and regulatory requirements if you’re seeking for a device that detects both smoke and carbon monoxide or if you live in a state that mandates both types of devices.

Sensors and Sensitivity in carbon monoxide detector

Electrochemical sensors are used by carbon monoxide detectors to find the gas, which has no color or smell. The sensitivity of a carbon monoxide detector need to meet Underwriter’s Laboratory (UL) security requirements. In accordance with these, a carbon monoxide detector must notify you if CO levels rise to 400 PPM within 15 minutes, 200 PPM within 35 minutes, and 100 PPM within 90 minutes.

Particles in the air can harm a carbon monoxide alarm sensor. Due to the possibility of the detector’s sensor becoming clogged or otherwise harmed by small particles released by the furnace, Kelly Johnson-Arbor, a medical toxicologist and interim executive director of the National Capital Poison Center, issues the following warning.

Display – carbon monoxide detector

A lot of CO detectors are screenless. However, the majority of devices feature tiny lights that steadily flash or blink to signal proper operation, a fault, or an alarm. In order to get additional information from a carbon monoxide detector, look for a model with a display that shows the greatest amounts of carbon monoxide ever recorded, offers you battery life status updates, and even displays the temperature of the room.

Source of power

The location possibilities and ease of installation of a carbon monoxide detector are determined by its power supply. In the event of a power outage, a hardwired carbon monoxide alarm uses a battery backup in addition to its electrical grid connection. Installing the most sophisticated carbon monoxide detector is best done without an existing hardwired connection.

The simplest to install carbon monoxide detectors have plug-in or battery power sources. Plug-in models use regular electrical outlets to supply electricity. They frequently have installed batteries as an alternate power supply source, just like hardwired carbon monoxide detectors.

The term “portable” is also sometimes used to describe battery-operated carbon monoxide detectors. They are perfect for use while traveling or in a space where it is not possible to install or plug in a carbon monoxide detector.

Interconnectivity

A lot of carbon monoxide detectors are screenless. However, the majority of devices feature tiny lights that steadily flash or blink to signal proper operation, a fault, or an alarm. In order to get additional information from a carbon monoxide detector, look for a model with a display that shows the greatest amounts of carbon monoxide ever recorded, offers you battery life status updates, and even displays the temperature of the room.

Remember that not all linked carbon monoxide detectors from different companies are always compatible while shopping for them. Look for carbon monoxide alarms with appropriate interconnectivity after checking the specifications for any smoke or carbon monoxide detectors you already have installed. Additionally, seek for gadgets with latching alarms. They provide information about which carbon monoxide detector triggered the alert, which might be useful in determining where a CO leak is coming from.

Sound

Alarms for carbon monoxide are audible and sound at a volume of 85 decibels on carbon monoxide detectors. Voice alerts are also present in some models, though. Depending on the gadget, they may broadcast the threat or identify the place where it was discovered.