Samsung LSP7T vs Optoma P2 – can you play 4K games?

Samsung LSP7T vs Optoma P2
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Which has longer lamp life – Samsung LSP7T vs Optoma P2? Laser technology delivers outstanding brightness up to 30,000 hours of light source life that maintains stunning image quality throughout its lifespan. 3,000 lumens of brightness enable lights-on viewing for entertainment in a variety of environments, any time of day. Can you play 4K games – Samsung LSP7T vs Optoma P2? True 4K UHD resolution, HDR10 compatibility, pure glass optics, a laser light source, PureMotion image processing and premium sound come together in a sleek form factor to produce an instant cinematic experience anywhere.

Pros & Cons – Samsung LSP7T vs Optoma P2

Samsung LSP7T

Pros

  • Used with an Elite Screens CLR (not the 2 or 3, just the CLR). Great combo.
  • Vivid picture with good colors for a projector. I can compare this to the Optoma P1 and P2 and say that it has better picture quality
  • Software platform is rock solid
  • Connection/HDMI stability is also super rock solid with no issues whatsoever on a variety of sources.
  • Fan noise is non-existent. Completely silent.
  • Projector turns on and shuts down perfectly with CEC control.

Cons

  • Focus issues at the corners and edges from mid to top.
  • Some shadow crushing in live content especially in scenes that are generally darkly lit.

Optoma P2

Pros

  • Accurate, vibrant colors from all content sources
  • Ultra-short throw distance
  • High sound quality from built-in soundbar
  • Easy to set up with SmartFIT app and automatic focus
  • Compatible with Alexa and Google voice control and IFTTT

Cons

  • SmartFIT app can have issues with pull-down screens
  • Can be tricky to synchronize built-in soundbar with external speakers

Specs – Samsung LSP7T vs Optoma P2

Samsung LSP7T

  • Size/type: 4K laser projector
  • Resolution: 3840 x 2160 (4K Ultra HD)
  • Operating system: Tizen
  • Inputs: 3 x HDMI, 1 x USB
  • Outputs: Optical digital audio out
  • HDR: HDR10 +
  • Dimensions: 532 x 132.7 x 342 mm
  • Other: Built-in speakers
  • Web: samsung.com

Optoma CinemaX P2

  • Ultra-short throw laser projector with 3000 lumens output
  • HDR10 and Hybrid Log-Gamma support (through USB)
  • 3D support
  • Two internal speakers with Dolby 2.0 tuned sound, 40 watts total power
  • Projects a 120-inch diagonal image from 16.5 inches away
  • Android TV 8.0 built-in
  • Bluetooth remote

Price

The Samsung LSP7T, while being the more economical option in the Premiere line (MSRP $3,499) delivers a tremendous value at a more affordable price point. Delivering 2,200 lumens of brightness and a maximum screen size of 120″ at 18″ away from the screen, the LSP7T is inline with the other competing USTs in the price range.

The Optoma CinemaX P2 sells for £2,999 / $3,299. This represents a saving of around £300 / $300 on the original Cinema X, aka the UHZ65UST, a model which remains available. In terms of design, there’s nothing between the two, although this more affordable offering differs on some key parameters.

Samsung LSP7T vs Optoma P2 Review

Design

Samsung LSP7T

The Premiere is slightly smaller than many ultra short-throw laser rivals, making it easier to fit on a sideboard. Another nice touch is the way its ergonomic, button-lite ‘smart’ remote control continues the crisp white finish theme.

Optoma P2

It’s a sleek design that looks attractive on the top of a table, and while it’s significantly deeper than a TV, at 5.12 x 22.68 x 15.08 inches (HWD), it is less than half the width of the average 55-inch TV and much less obtrusive when it’s off.

Ports

Samsung LSP7T

It is equipped with a DTT tuner, 3 HDMI ports and a USB multimedia port, is WiFi compatible and features the exclusive Tizen operating system. The Samsung The Premiere LSP7T therefore provides access to many apps, including Netflix, Disney+, Prime Video and YouTube. Its 2.2 channel stereo audio section benefits from 30-watt amplification.

Optoma P2

there’s a light gray angled grille that covers the 40-watt two-channel, four-speaker array. On the back (the side that faces the screen) are two HDMI 2.0 inputs with HDCP 2.2 (one with ARC), two USB 2.0 ports, an optical out, 3.5mm audio out, and Ethernet connection. There’s an additional USB power and HDMI 1.4 input on the right side. A single button on the top left turns the projector on and off, while all other controls are relegated to the remote. 

Size

Samsung LSP7T

The Samsung The Premiere LSP7T UST projector is designed to provide a very large image at a very short distance from the projection screen or the wall on which the image is projected. An image size of 90 inches across (2.28m diagonal, 2m base) can be achieved by placing the projector just under 25cm away from the wall. The maximum image size is 120 inches across (3.04m diagonal, 2.65m base) at a distance of only 41.5cm.

Optoma P2

The basics of the projector are unchanged. A 0.47” DLP chip delivers 3840 x 2160 pixels using Fast-Switch XPR technology. The max image size is 120 inches with the P2 placed 16.5 inches from the screen. The claimed output is still 3000 lumens and you get support for 3D and HDR10. HLG is also accepted through a USB input. 

Setup

Samsung LSP7T

The Samsung projector projects the image at a very steep angle onto the wall or screen. You must therefore be extra careful with the positioning to avoid the image being skewed or out of focus.

Although Samsung has included some digital adjustment options (including keystone), these are best suited for fine-tuning after you have finished the physical location.

Optoma P2

For a 120-inch diagonal screen, the top of CinemaX P2 needs to be about a foot below the bottom of the screen edge, and the back of the projector needs to be 13.5 inches from the screen (which puts the front of the projector 28.6 inches away from the screen). It takes some time to get the picture just right, but in the end it’s worth it.

Lamp life

Samsung LSP7T

The Samsung The Premiere LSP7T ultra short throw projector is equipped with a DLP matrix capable of displaying a 16:9 image in 4K Ultra High Definition. The laser, which offers a maximum brightness of 2200 lumens, is paired with a chromatic wheel with four colors (yellow, red, green, blue). It has an estimated lifespan of 20,000 hours, which is over 18 years of use at a rate of 3 hours a day.

Optoma P2

Instead of a traditional lamp, the CinemaX P2 uses one of Optoma’s DuraCore laser light engines. It’s IP5X/IP6X certified, which keeps the optical engine free of dust and moisture, and will last up to 30,000 hours in Eco mode (20,000 in Normal) before reaching half brightness. So while the cost of lamp replacements needs to be factored in to the lifetime purchase price of traditional projectors, laser projectors need zero normal maintenance for their life.

The DuraCore light source sends a blue laser through a yellow phosphor before passing through a six-segment RGBRGB color wheel.

Remote

Samsung LSP7T

Many people will probably notice the remote control: it is about exactly the same as the one we find on Samsung’s smart TVs. The same applies to the menu system, which contains many of the features we know from the TV world. Streaming services such as YouTube, Netflix and Disney+ are available directly from the the projector. 

Optoma P2

The small, black metal remote operates via Bluetooth instead of IR. It’s light, only has a half dozen buttons in addition to a directional pad and volume control, and has a dim backlight that won’t blind you in a dark room. The remote doubles as a wand, which becomes a necessity for some of the apps available through the awful Aptoide OS (more below in The Downside). Instead of changing batteries, the remote is chargeable with a USB cable.

Audio

Samsung LSP7T

Samsung has equipped the LSP7T with built-in speakers and 30 watts of output power. The sound is roughly equivalent to what you would expect from a regular TV. The Samsung speaker creates a fairly large and clear sound image, with good voice reproduction and usable fullness in the bass.

Optoma P2

The built-in 40-watt sound system consists of two 2-inch full range aluminum drivers and 2.75-inch woofers with ported chambers. There’s good dialogue clarity from the speakers, and the ported chambers help a little with the bass response, but there’s only so much you can expect in that department from a 2.75-inch woofer.

App

Samsung LSP7T

In the same smooth and handy environment that we are used to on Samsung TVs, we find all important streaming apps, among other things. Netflix, YouTube, Amazon Video, Apple TV, Disney+, they’re all there. You can watch in HDR and you can even cast from YouTube and Netflix to the projector. Airplay2 is also supported.

Samsung LSP7T vs Optoma P2
Samsung LSP7T vs Optoma P2

The media player takes files from USB or a DLNA server. It is quite complete, but keep in mind that it no longer supports Divx/Xvid codec, nor DTS soundtracks. Just like on Samsung TVs.

Yes, this projector can take the place of your TV, and it even has built-in TV tuners (DVB-T/C/S). Unfortunately, there is no CI+ slot to be found, which means that the added value in Belgium and the Netherlands is limited. After all, you can only watch unencrypted channels with it, and that list is quite short.

Optoma P2

One interesting feature that Optoma added to the P2 is the FRAMED app. Instead of a typical screensaver, the FRAMED app has twelve different curated pieces of art that were created by ten different digital artists. It’s a nice way to add some beautiful works of art to your wall.

Samsung LSP7T vs Optoma P2 Performance review

Samsung LSP7T

Although it’s a DLP projector, the DynamicBlack feature appears to work as advertised. When watching movies in a darkened room, I was surprised at the depth of the black levels it achieved. Elevated black levels never distracted me, and I found that overall, this Samsung delivers a picture with plenty of punch. Of course, once you introduce some ambient light to a room, black levels become less important than peak brightness. This projector handles both bright and dark room viewing environments well.

Color is the strong suit of this projector. It exceeds DCI/P3 gamut, so when you watch UHD HDR movies you are seeing all the colors contained in the film. This is thrilling when watching animated content, Spider-Man Into the Spider-Verse as an example was pure eye-candy through this projector.

Optoma P2

While the CinemaX P2 has a Game picture mode, gaming mode can be turned on in the menu no matter what picture mode you’re in. It disables extra processing, like PureMotion, to bring down the input lag. Unfortunately it only brings the lag down to 58.4ms. That’s a significant improvement over the 121.5ms I measured without gaming mode turned on, but it still means aiming and firing my weapons in Cyberpunk 2077 felt sluggish. And playing against other players online in games like Overwatch could have a detrimental effect on your rankings.

Knowing that Optoma has dialled back the spec, we felt some trepidation about the P2’s performance. As it happens, there’s still plenty of wow in the tank. Images are crisp, color-rich and delightfully impactful.

The CinemaX P2 is built around a single chip DLP 4K device allied to a laser light engine, which translates to pin-sharp pictures (no chance of any panel alignment issues here) and excellent colour vibrancy. 

Animation is particularly ravishing, while nature documentaries feel far larger than life. The laser engine also has a long operating life, quoted at around 20,000 hours.  

Recommended

Recommended Settings for SDR & HDR

  • Mode Cinema
  • Brightness -8
  • Contrast 8
  • Sharpness 4
  • Color/Tint 0
  • Gamma 2.4
  • Brilliant Color 1
  • Color Temp Warm

Color Matching – Hue Sat Gain

  • R -5 0 0
  • G -19 6 -12
  • B -14 0 -16
  • C -20 -4 -6
  • Y -23 -5 0
  • M 2 -7 -5

RGB Gain/Bias – R G B

  • Gain -3 0 -1
  • Bias -1 0 0

HDR

  • Mode Standard
  • Brightness -4
  • Contrast 10
  • Sharpness 4
  • Color/Tint 0
  • Gamma 2.4
  • Brilliant Color 1
  • Color Temp Standard

Color Matching – Hue Sat Gain

  • R 0 8 29
  • G 0 10 20
  • B -10 0 15
  • C -20 -4 25
  • Y -21 -5 15
  • M 27 -5 20

RGB Gain/Bias – R G B

  • Gain -1 0 -1
  • Bias 0 0 0

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