Palm Tungsten E2 Handheld review – how to use WiFi?

Palm Tungsten E2 Handheld review
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How to use Palm Tungsten E2 Handheld? It is wonderful as an address / phone book. It is small and easy to carry. It works anywhere. You don’t have to “be connected”. Synch your Palm info with your computer for backup. Or in the computer Palm program, add new address names, then Synch the Palm with the computer to add the computer info to the Palm. Get detaiols in Palm Tungsten E2 Handheld review.

It had a standard 3.5 mm headphone jack, a longer-lasting battery than the Tungsten E, had Bluetooth capability, and a single speaker on the back. It had 32 MB of memory (29.7 available), a 200 MHz Intel XScale processor, 320×320 Transflective TFT color display, and ran Palm OS Garnet v5.4.7. It is 114 by 79 by 15 millimeters (4.5 by 3.1 by 0.59 in) and weighs 133 grams (4.7 oz). More in Palm Tungsten E2 Handheld review.

In the box

  • Desktop Installation & Software
  • Essentials CD with Tutorial and
  • Tungsten™ E2 handheld
  • Multi-connector, AC power adapter
  • (108-132 VAC/60 Hz U.S.)
  • Flipcover
  • Stylus
  • USB sync cable with palmOne™
  • Getting Started Guide in PDF format

Handheld

  • Tasks
  • NotePad
  • Calendar
  • Contacts
  • Web Browser
  • Bluetooth Manager
  • Memos
  • palmOne Media for photos and videos
  • RealPlayer for MP3 (SD card required)
  • Calculator

Specs – Palm Tungsten E2 Handheld

  • Memory 32MB (26MB actual storage capacity)
  • Screen 320×320 Transflective TFT color display with touchscreen, supports more than 65,000 colors
  • Size and Weight 4.5”x 3.1”x .59”, 4.7oz.
  • Processor Intel® 200MHz processor (ARM-based)
  • Operating System Palm OS® Garnet (v5.4)
  • Expansion Slot Supports SD, SDIO and MultiMediaCard™ expansion-cards to add up to 1GB of extra memory, features or content4
  • Updated document support Create and edit Word, Excel, and PowerPoint compatible files.
  • Open Adobe PDF files.2
  • Bluetooth® wireless technology Built-in Bluetooth technology for connecting to compatible wireless devices, such as mobile phones, laptops, and printers1
  • Battery Rechargeable Lithium-Ion battery, for long battery life
  • Fast Sync Easily update your Outlook3 information
  • 5-way Navigator Access information with just one hand
  • Stereo headphone jack Accepts standard stereo headphones for audio playback (sold separately)
  • Cable/Power Uses a USB sync cable and AC adapter (108-132 VAC/60 Hz U.S.)

Price

Factor in impressive battery life and an affordable $249 price tag, and PalmOne has another winner on its hands. 

Palm Tungsten E2 Handheld review

Design

The Palm Tungsten E2 Handheld sports a sleek and compact form factor, though it adds just a hair more weight and depth (4.5 by 3.1 by 0.6 inches; 4.7 ounces). An attractive dark-silver finish wraps up the package. The included sync cable is an improvement over the Tungsten E, in that it’s got a button to sync. You can plug in your powered-off unit, and hit the button on the cable, rather than having to power up the unit to do it from the screen, or having to reserve one of the function buttons for the purpose.

Connectors

The Tungsten E2 now uses a multiconnector USB cable with one-button HotSync operation. Extras are sparse; there is no desktop cradle included in the box ($50 optional), but it comes with a faux leather flip cover, which slides into a slot on the left side, and a power adapter. 

Screen

Everything looks sharper, a little brighter, and a little more vivid, and it’s readable even in direct sunlight. . While it keeps the 320×320-pixel resolution of the Tungsten E, the new PalmOne now displays 65,536 colors instead of 64,000, and the difference is noticeable. The E2’s improved 3.7-inch-diagonal TFT color screen shines brightly, taking center stage.

Storage

Building on that solid foundation, the Tungsten E2 is powered by a faster 200MHz Intel XScale processor and comes with 32MB of nonvolatile flash memory, 26MB of which is user-accessible. The latter is important: it preserves your precious data if your PDA decides to call it quits, and it increases the battery life in the same breath.

Bluetooth WiFi

There’s a Bluetooth utility to turn on the radio and to set up compatible devices. We were able to connect to a Bluetooth-enabled Pocket PC and wirelessly beam contact information with no problem. 

Documents

Applications view displays all the programs on your handheld. Other software goodies include Acrobat Reader, SplashMoney, Web Blazer 4.0, and Memos. And when you feel like a little break, you have RealPlayer for MP3 playback, Kinoma Player for videos, PalmReader for e-books, and of course, Solitaire for amusement.

PalmOS

the E2 gets an upgrade to Palm OS 5.4, which includes DataViz’s Documents To Go 7.0, though there’s still no sign of Palm OS 6.0. The latest edition supports native Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint (view-only on Macs) so that you can view and edit documents on the go. In addition, the program boasts an improved user interface and supports active Web links in Word documents.

Palm Tungsten E2 Handheld Customer review

good gadget, but not for everyone

Palm doesn’t seem to put out new products now since this E2 has been on market for 2 years now without significant price drop, maybe due to lack of consumer interest. The market of these handheld PDAs are shrinking due to manufactures begin to push sales on new more powerful yet smaller portable notebook like those Samsung Q1 or whatever product. But I still found these handheld devices are the right size to carry, and powerful enough to keep your life organized.

Spec wise, the CPU inside E2 is kinda out dated, but it can handle some intensive task such as mpeg1, xvid, divx playback and play 2D/3D palm games. Expandibility, the SDIO slot only supports upto 1GB SD card, there are very few none standard 2GB SD card can be used on this machine. Personally I don’t find any use for the Bluetooth, I have a mac which is Bluetooth enabled, but cannot manage to share internet with it after lots of reading on the net… The infrared port, you can use it as a remote control after installing 3rd party software, but that costs a forturne, and you can eventually buy an entry level Logitech Harmony remote for that price… or you can transfer files on infrared enabled computers, but the transfer speed is upto 4MB only… So the only good thing about the device is the organizer, address book, memo stuff, I found them really useful.

The Graffiti input software is OK, need a bit memorization for shortcuts on cut, paste, change line stuff and some time to get used to the recognition errors. The office software suite comes with adobe reader and DataViz documents To Go. It’s not very comfortable to read complicated format documents since you’ll lose quite a bit info via conversion. Picture viewing is all right, you cannot expect too much on a 3.5in screen, all the functions you need are there and the loading time is OK. As an mp3 player, it gets the job done, but not on par with real players, the included realone player reads a specific location on the SD card…

For videos, I’m using TCPMP, it’s amazing at playing back xvid/divx files, but you have to convert them to a 320*320 compatible resolution and keep the framerate @15fps. There are some games worth playing, I have a sudoku game currently on it. The synchronizing software is dumb, it synchronizes everything every time even if you just want to download a PDF or *.doc file, my suggestion is synchronizing once after you set the whole thing up, avoid using the software, go get pilot install, that’s much efficient in downloading software. Don’t know what else to comment. I wouldn’t recommend this kind of device to average people, since a cellphone and ipods seem to be dominant.

By kai0 at Best Buy

How to use Palm Tungsten E2 Handheld?

Just below the screen is a virtual input area with one-touch access to the Home page, with Menu on the left side, while Favorites and a search function sit on the right. Unlike the Tungsten T5, however, there’s no handy taskbar along the bottom to quickly launch other applications or to switch the screen to Landscape mode.

You do, however, get four standard customizable shortcut keys (Calendar, Contacts, Tasks, and Notepad, by default) and a five-way navigation toggle. The keys are spacious, though set deeper within the case, rather than slightly raised above the surface, so they require a little effort to press–not a deal breaker but something to be aware of.

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